Skip to content

Schools in Science

Share
Share

Monash University has the largest Structural geology group in Australia. The group focuses on a broad range of activities from applied structural controls of mineral systems; experimental structural  geology;  regional  terrane  architecture; orogenic  processes,  basin  systems,  microstructural  analysis, crustal scale shear zones, and glaciology.

Researchers

 

Professor Sandy Cruden

  • Pure and applied structural geology
  • Analogue modelling
  • Structural control of mineral systems
  • Digital mapping using UAV's
 

Emeritus Professor Chris Wilson

  • Evolution of tectonic structures in rocks and ice
  • Field based structural analysis and geophysical techniques
  • Experiments and numerical models to study microstructures and textures related to deformation in crustal rocks.
 

Professor Peter Betts

  • Field based structural mapping
  • Orogenic processes
  • Proterozoic tectonics
  • Neotectonics.

Professor Roberto Weinberg

  • Orogenic process
  • Crustal scale shear zones
  • Archaean tectonics.
  • I run a website where I explore a wide range of geological features and regions, with a wide selection of photographs. It currently consists of over 130 pages that provide the geological context for more than 3000 high-quality photographs (see here)

 

Associate Professor Steven Micklethwaite

  • Brittle deformation processes
  • Structural control of fluid flow
  • Digital mapping using UAV's
  • Microstructural deformation processes
 

Dr Laurent Ailleres

  • Field based structural mapping
  • Orogenic processes
  • Neotectonics
 

Dr Robin Armit

  • Field based structural mapping
  • Orogenic processes
  • Proterozoic tectonics
 

Dr Stefan Vollgger

  • 3D ore deposit modelling
  • Economic Geology
  • Structural Geology
  • Orogenic Gold deposits/VMS deposits
  • Structural Control on Mineralisation
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)/Digital Photogrammetry
  • Digital Geology
  • Hydrothermal fluid flow in the Crust.

Graduate students

 

Mr Nicholas Hunter (PhD)
In my project I am using microstructures and textures of mylonitic rocks to develop methods through which the structural and dynamic properties of crustal shear zones can be quantitatively described. The Main Central Thrust (Alaknanda Valley, NW Himalaya)  is a natural laboratory for this type of work, as it comprises variably deformed quartz mylonite units across its structure. The simple composition of these units serve as an ideal medium for advanced microstructural analysis. I combine electron back scatter diffraction, neutron diffraction and optical   petrography to understand the development of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO), the modification of microstructures, and the activity of different deformation mechanisms along the strain profile. At the completion of my thesis I hope to provide a quantitative framework for describing shear zones worldwide.

Mr Mathias Egglseder (PhD)
My project focuses on the application of structural geology principles to banded iron formation (BIF) - hosted iron ore deposits in the Hamersley Province, Western Australia. My goal is to improve the understanding of how BIF deform and the involved processes on multiple scales by combining microtectonics, microfabric analyses and X-ray microscopy with geochemistry and deposit-scale 3D implicit and explicit modelling.

Mr David Willis (PhD)
My PhD project aims to reconstruct the location of the North and South Islands of New Zealand over the last ~23 million years. In conjunction field work we are also using numerical models in an attempt to recreate some of the measurements we take from rocks  in the field. These models provide an amazing opportunity to visualise the possible movement of the tectonic plates and the processes which drive changes along the plate boundary. In combining both field studies and numerical modelling we hope to provide new insights into the processes that control the  motion of tectonic plates, and how this plate boundary in turn controls the distribution of mountain ranges, earthquakes and volcanoes.
 
Mr Martin Schwindinger (PhD)
My project focusses on the different aspects of generation and evolution of granitic magmas in a near source environment by studying migmatites and related intrusive granites in the southern Adelaide fold belt (Kangaroo Island). My goal is to contribute to the ongoing debate about the significance of water-fluxed melting, magma mixing and entrainment of source material in the formation of granitic magmas.


Ms Lauren Wolfram (PhD)

My PhD research looks at high-temperature metamorphic rocks (migmatites) and granites in northwest Argentina, and the processes contributing to elemental differentiation of the earth during melting of the continental crust. I have implemented a multidisciplinary approach integrating detailed field observations, metamorphic and igneous petrography, whole rock and mineral geochemistry, and zircon and monazite geochronology. I hope to contribute to further understanding the evolution and compositional diversity of crustal-derived magmas, and assess the broader implications for differentiation and thermal stability of the continental crust.

Mr Frediano Clos (PhD)

The aim of my project is to provide new structural, geochemical and metamorphic constraints on the evolution of the Archean Yalgoo Dome, a broad elliptical dome (50x100 km) in the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia.

 

Ms Alice Roberts (PhD)

 Mr Pablo Farias (PhD)
 Mr Ivan Semenov (PhD)
  

Recent Publications

2016

  • Hunter, N.J., Hasalova, P., Weinberg, R.F., and Wilson, C.J., 2016, Fabric controls on strain accommodation in naturally deformed mylonites: the influence of interconnected micaceous layers, Journal of Structural Geology, vol. 83, pp. 180-193.
  • Ganade de Araujo, Cordani, U.G., Agbossoumounde, Y., Caby, R., Basei, MA.S., Weinberg, R.F., and Sato, K, 2016, Tightening-up NE Brazil and NW Africa connections: new U-Pb/Lu-Hf zircon data of a complete plate tectonic cycle in the Dahomey belt of the West Gondwana Orogen in Togo and Benin, Precambrian Research, vol. 276, pp. 24–42.
  • Clemens,J. D., Regmi, K., Nicholls, I. A., Weinberg, R. F., and Maas, R. (in press). The Tynong pluton, its mafic synplutonic sheets and igneous microgranular enclaves: the nature of the mantle connection in I-type granitic magmas,Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology.
  • Regmi, K.R., Weinberg, R.F. and Nicholls, I., 2016, Testing the chemical signature of chaotic magma mixing, Himalayan Geology, vol. 37, pp. 8-16.
  • Riel, N., Mercier, J., and Weinberg, R.F., 2016, Convection in a partially molten metasedimentary crust: Insights from the El Oro Complex (Ecuador). Geology. doi:10.1130/G37208.1

2015

  • Cohalan, L., Weinberg, R.F., Squire, R., and Allen, C., 2015, Early deformation in the Eastern Goldfields, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, Precambrian Research, v. 266, p. 212–226.
  • Regenauer-Lieb, K., et al., 2015, Multiscale, multiphysics geomechanics for geodynamics applied to buckling instabilities in the middle of the Australian Craton. Philosophical Magazine, v. 95 (28-30), p. 3055-3077.
  • Finch, M., Weinberg, R.F., Fuentes, G., Hasalova, P., and Becchio, R., 2015, One kilometre-thick ultramylonite, Sierra de Quilmes, Sierras Pampeanas, NW Argentina. Journal of Structural Geology, v. 72, p. 33-54.
  • Finch, M.A., Weinberg, R.F., Fuentes, M.G., Hasalova, P., and Becchio, R., 2015, Reply to comment by S.H. Buttner on: "One kilometre-thick ultramylonite, Sierra de Quilmes, Sierras Pampeanas, NW Argentina. Journal of Structural Geology, v. 76, p. 84-85.

Awards

2016

Royal Society of Victoria Young Scientist Research Prize for the Earth Sciences.  “Iron oxide nanocrystals – Tiny minerals building huge iron ore deposits”-Mathias Egglseder

IDR seed funding to identify and characterise subsurface pipes to improve predictions of pipe failures in urban areas. (Armit, Wong, Micklethwaite).

OLT Citation Nomination (teaching team of ESC3180)- Laurent Ailleres, Robin Armit, Peter Betts, Andy Tomkins

Faculty of Science Award for Excellence in Postgraduate- Supervision Laurent Ailleres

2015

Royal Society of Victoria Young Scientist Research Prize for the Earth Sciences-Stefan Vollgger

GSA Bruce Hobbs Medal for excellent contributions to structural geology and tectonics- Peter Betts

Vice Chancellor Excellence in Teaching Special Commendation awarded to the teaching team of ESC3180 – Field Geology (Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

Faculty of Science Dean’s Excellence in Teaching award – Awarded to the teaching team of ESC3180 – Field Geology- (Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor for the teaching team of ESC3180 - Field Geology (Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology(Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

2014

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology(Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

2013

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology (Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

2012

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology (Betts, Tomkins, Ailleres, Armit).

Collier Grant for the introduction of petrophysical measurements in field activities (Ci’s Betts and Ailleres)

2011

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology

2010

Letter of Commendation for Excellence in Teaching from the Pro-Vice Chancellor, for ESC3180 Field Geology

Collier Grant to introduce digital teaching into field courses. (CI’s Betts, Tomkins and Ailleres)