Prof. Sandy Cruden - Honours Projects

United granites of Victoria

Supervisor(s): Sandy Cruden; Peter Betts; Robin Armit; Laurent Ailleres
Field of study: Structural geology, applied geophysics
Projects available: Up to 2 projects available

The granites of Victoria are famous for past research on their petrology and geochemistry, which contributed to defining the I- and S-classification. Despite this, much less is known about the 3D geometry of individual intrusions, their emplacement mechanisms and how they relate to the different tectonic phases of the Lachlan fold belt. Several projects are available to “take apart” selected granite plutons in Victoria using a variety of structural and geophysical techniques, including measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), gravity surveys and modelling, interpretation of aeromagnetic data, and structural analysis of pluton-wall rock relationships.

For further information, contact: Sandy Cruden

Emplacement and flow within the giant Tasmanian dolerites

Supervisor(s): Sandy Cruden
Field of study: Structural geology, magnetic fabric analysis, microstructure
Projects available: Up to 1 project available

Although sills are a major transport mode of magmas within the lithosphere, there are still many outstanding questions regarding their mechanics of emplacement. This project will involve a detailed structural study of sills in southern Tasmania. Fieldwork will involve detailed structural mapping of sill margins and tips aided by UAV drone imagery, and collection of oriented samples. Sill flow directions will be determined from measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and microstructural observations from thin sections will help to characterise the country rock deformation induced during emplacement.

For further information, contact: Sandy Cruden

Analogue modelling of crustal deformation

Supervisor(s): Sandy Cruden
Field of study: Structural geology, experimental tectonics
Projects available: Up to 1 project available

This is a laboratory-based project

Analogue experiments in the laboratory are a powerful tool for investigating the four-dimensional evolution of structures and to test hypotheses on the tectonic evolution of structural systems. The geodynamic modelling laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art infrastructure for analogue material characterisation and quantitative analysis of progressive deformation within experiments. There are opportunities for honours students to undertake a variety of projects in the laboratory that will involve test new analogue materials and their use in experiments on the evolution of strike slip, thrust and extension fault systems.

Structure and emplacement of the Eagle Ni-sulphide deposits, Michigan, USA

Supervisor(s): Sandy Cruden
Field of study: Structural geology, applied geophysics, microstructure
Projects available: Up to 1 project available

The ca. 1107 Ma Eagle peridotites and associated Eagle and Eagle East Ni-sulfide ore bodies were emplaced into weakly to moderately folded, ca. 1.85 Ga Baraga basin sandstones and shales. This project provides an opportunity to further understanding of this intrusion-hosted ore system through 3D modelling of drill core data, interpretation of 3D seismic reflection, gravity and magnetic data, and microstructural and XRF (Tornado) imaging of samples.

This is a laboratory-based project that may include travel to UWA and CSIRO in Perth

For further information, contact: Sandy Cruden

Laboratory based projects are also available using existing samples

For further information, contact: Sandy Cruden