Criminology and Information Technology - A2009

This course is commencing in 2019.

Criminology is the study of crime and social control. Crime, how we define it, understanding its causes, and the ways we respond to it provides a window into a society’s challenges, values and aspirations. You’ll consider the local, national and global aspects of crime and justice and become familiar with a range of lenses for understanding and assessing the efficiency and impact of society’s changing understandings and responses. You’ll gain an understanding of victimisation and perpetration, inequality and its impacts, approaches to understanding crime and difference and learn about crime committed by individuals, groups, organisations and states and the mechanisms of the criminal justice system including police, courts and corrections.

You’ll engage with research and policy leaders in crime and justice and experience criminal justice in action in a range of international, national and local contexts. The course challenges you to apply abstract knowledge to real-world problems of crime and justice and develop solutions. You’ll be equipped to identify credible evidence, understand measurement and analyse the policy impact, and to develop informed, independent thinking skills.

This course equips students with industry-relevant specialist skills to prepare for working and living in a world of constant technological, environmental, political and population change. These skills include the capacity to critically evaluate evidence, develop and support arguments, conduct research using a variety of methodological approaches, advanced oral and written communication and an understanding of the possibilities and challenges of reform.

The globalising nature of information technology calls out for people with a strong technical background and deep understanding of human society.

As a graduate you will have the technical expertise to shape and manage current and emerging technologies together with the lifelong communication, research and critical thinking skills that are acquired through study in the arts and humanities.

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At a glance

Subject prerequisites
English Maths Sciences / Other
Tick Tick N/A

Course Details

Location
  • On-campus at Clayton: Full time & part time
Duration
  • 4 years (full time)
  • 8 years (part time)
Start date
First semester (February 2019), Second semester (July 2019)
Qualification
Bachelor of Criminology, Bachelor of Information Technology
Course Handbook

View details specific to degree:

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Majors, extended majors and minors

In this course, you can choose from the following majors, extended majors and minors. Some are only available as minors or only in certain locations, so click through to see the full details.

Hear how Monash Arts graduate Associate Professor Kate Fitz-Gibbon uses the skills she learnt through her Arts degree to combat one of our nation’s most insidious issues: family violence.

Kate is Director, Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre.

Benefits of a double degree

A double degree in Criminology & Information Technology could give you a unique combination of skills to apply to a larger number of organisations and industries - problem-solving, teamwork, research, critical thinking and cultural sensitivity.

What is crime and criminology?

Global Immersion Guarantee

Visit China, Italy, Indonesia, Malaysia or India with the fully-funded GIG program. Apply your in-class learning to real-world situations at the intersection of society, technology and the environment.

Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements (Domestic students)

You need to satisfy all of the following requirements to be considered for entry into this course.

Qualifications

Equivalent Australian Year 12

Alternative qualifications and prerequisites

For other domestic and international qualification entry requirements and scores for this course use the study credit and admissions eligibility search.

English requirements

Level A
IELTS (Academic): 6.5 Overall score, with minimum band scores: Listening 6.0, Reading 6.0, Writing 6.0 and Speaking 6.0 Pearson Test of English (Academic): 58 Overall score, with minimum scores: Listening 50, Reading 50, Speaking 50 and Writing 50TOEFL Internet-based test: 79 Overall score, with minimum scores: Reading 13, Listening 12, Speaking 18 and Writing 21 Equivalent approved English test

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Making the application

Future students

Semester one (February)

Applications for on campus studies should be made online through the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre

Apply through VTAC

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash using course code A2009

Apply

Current Monash students

You may apply to transfer from another Monash course. Transfers are a competitive process. You may apply mid-year for available courses however consideration will be given as to whether you will be able to follow your course progression.

Please note that if you apply for a course transfer, you should still enrol in your current course as if you were continuing so as not to jeopardise your enrolment in the Faculty if your transfer application is unsuccessful. More about Course Transfer...

Self assess for credit eligibility

Check for study credit using the "Credit search" link on the Credit for prior study page

Fees

Fees are subject to change annually.

Commonwealth supported place (CSP)

Commonwealth supported places (CSP) are available for this course. The student contribution amount for 2021 is yet to be confirmed by the Australian government. Fees to be advised.

Full fee

Fees are per 48 credit points which represents a standard full-time course load for a year.

A$33,600

Scholarships

We offer over 360 types of scholarships, valued at up to $280,000. Some scholarships offer one-off payments while others continue for the length of your course. Learn more about Monash Scholarships.

Other fees

The Student Services and Amenities Fee applies to some students each calendar year.