Laws and Criminology - L3012

A Monash Law degree will enable you to join the next generation of high achieving lawyers, with the ability to solve complex, demanding and interesting problems.

The Criminology degree responds to the increasing global demand for graduates with a deep understanding of the role of crime in contemporary social and economic life, and well-developed professional skills in understanding global issues in crime.

This double degree will allow you to graduate with expertise in both of these skill sets in a clearly named double degree.

At a glance

Course Details

Location
  • On-campus at Clayton: Full time
Duration
5 years (full time) This course is equivalent to 5.25 years of full-time study and may be accelerated to complete in five years. This will require a one unit overload in each of two semesters. 10 years (part time)
Start date
First semester (February), Second semester (July)
Course Handbook

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Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements (International students)

You need to satisfy all of the following requirements to be considered for entry into this course.

At the time of enrolment in a course at Monash University, you must be at least 17 years of age.

View all minimum age requirements.

All Monash undergraduate courses require you to have successfully completed a minimum of an Australian Year 12 qualification (or equivalent) and achieve the required academic entry score. Most Monash faculties generally use your most recent studies for admission however other guidelines may apply where your prior qualification may be considered.

Entry requirements for each qualification level are as follows:

All Monash undergraduate courses require you to satisfy English entry requirements in one of the following ways:

If you do not meet the above English proficiency test scores, consider Monash English Bridging. Some Monash courses however do not accept Monash English Bridging.

The English measures outlined above must be completed within 2 years prior to the Monash course commencement date (other time limitations may apply as outlined in the Monash University Procedure). If you have completed several measures of English proficiency over a period of time, the highest valid measure will be accepted.

Monash University reserve the right to ask students to complete an English proficiency test to meet English course requirements upon request.

Further information can be located at English language requirements.

All Monash University undergraduate courses require you to have previously studied and achieved required Australian level standards in certain specific subject known as prerequisite subjects.

You must satisfy the following prerequisite subject requirements for this course:

Meeting prerequisite subject requirements from other international qualifications:

You can still meet the above prerequisite subject requirements if you have completed other international qualifications. These subjects will be assessed on a case by case basis when you apply.

Alternative pathways

If you don't satisfy the requirements for direct entry consider these pathway options.

Double degree courses include the features of the component degree courses, except that electives may be reduced.

Law

L3001 Bachelor of Laws (Honours) course is a specialist course that develops through themes: legal methodology and legal practice, public law and private law. The specialised knowledge and advanced skills are imparted in later year elective units, including a final year project involving intensive research and writing.

Part A. Legal methodology and legal practice

This theme includes the nature of law, and particularly statute law enacted by parliaments and common law developed by courts. It also includes the key concepts, principles and methods of research and reasoning that enable lawyers to identify and interpret law and apply it to relevant facts in order to provide legal advice. It covers the law of procedure and evidence that governs judicial proceedings, alternative methods of resolving legal disputes, and the code of ethics that regulates the professional conduct of legal practitioners.

Part B. Public law

Public law includes constitutional law, administrative law and criminal law. It concerns the powers and procedures of the legislative, executive and judicial organs of government, and how they are regulated and controlled by 'the rule of law'. It also concerns the legal relationship between government and individuals, including the protection of individual rights.

Part C. Private law

Private law deals with legal relationships between legal persons, including corporations as well as individuals. It includes the study of property rights, contractual rights and obligations, wrongs (called 'torts') such as trespass and the negligent infliction of injury, and the law of equity and trusts.

Part D. Extending specialised knowledge and advanced skills: Law electives

In later years of the course, you will be able to choose from a broad range of elective law units. High achieving students may also include one or two master's units in their final year of study. Elective law units enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of law that suit your own interests, skills and career goals. In addition to public and private law, these include international law, commercial law and human rights law. You will have opportunities to study overseas, and to undertake work-based learning, for example, in our legal clinical program and in local and international internships.

Criminology

A2008 Bachelor of Criminology is a specialist course that develops through three themes that combine to underpin criminology studies: Part A.Expert knowledge, Part B. Global reach and focus and Part C. Collaboration and innovation.

Part A. Expert knowledge

This will provide you with a foundational understanding of crime as a complex phenomenon, its social, economic and political impact, and the advantages and limitations associated with different strategies to address it. Students will gain an advanced understanding and develop critical thinking skills to reflect on important social issues such as inequality, vulnerability, and risk that have significant implications for the way we think about and deliver responses to crime, social justice, and security both in Australia and internationally.

Part B. Global reach and focus

This will enable you to develop an understanding of crime as a truly global phenomenon. You will learn about national and international criminal threats and develop the capacity to think critically about the role of states in creating crime and social harm. From a comparative standpoint, students will study the ways that crime manifests in different jurisdictions and how different societies define, govern and respond to crime. Students will gain practical and theoretical knowledge.

Part C. Collaboration and Innovation

You will develop a suite of transferable professional skills to respond effectively to pressing criminal concerns. Students will learn the skills to engage necessary stakeholders to allow them to effectively formulate, influence and evaluate crime and justice policies and practices in a variety of professional contexts. You will develop a critical understanding and develop advanced communication skills for collaborative problem solving and be competent in working in teams to address the problem of crime.

Making the application

Future students

Semester one (February)

Apply directly to Monash using course code L3012

Apply

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash using course code L3012

Apply

Current Monash students

You may apply to transfer from another Monash course. Transfers are a competitive process. You may apply mid-year for available courses however consideration will be given as to whether you will be able to follow your course progression.

Please note that if you apply for a course transfer, you should still enrol in your current course as if you were continuing so as not to jeopardise your enrolment in the Faculty if your transfer application is unsuccessful. More about Course Transfer...

Self assess for credit eligibility

Check for study credit using the "Credit search" link on the Credit for prior study page

Fees

Fees are subject to change annually.

International fee

Fees are per 48 credit points which represents a standard full-time course load for a year.

A$44,100

Scholarships

We offer over 360 types of scholarships, valued at up to $280,000. Some scholarships offer one-off payments while others continue for the length of your course. Learn more about Monash Scholarships.

Other fees

The Student Services and Amenities Fee applies to some students each calendar year.

Enrolment Obligations

International students enrolling in a CRICOS-registered course can study no more than one third (33%) of their course by distance and/or online learning. Students must enrol in at least one unit that is not by distance and/or online in each compulsory study period unless the student is completing the last unit of their course. See standard 8.19 and 8.20 of National Code of Practice for Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2018.

CRICOS code: 097663C